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Thus it is that dignity finds its (firm) root in








Source: THE TAO AND ITS CHARACTERISTICS
Category: PART II.

Thus it is that dignity finds its (firm) root in its (previous)
meanness, and what is lofty finds its stability in the lowness (from
which it rises) Hence princes and kings call themselves 'Orphans,'
'Men of small virtue,' and as 'Carriages without a nave' Is not this
an acknowledgment that in their considering themselves mean they see
the foundation of their dignity? So it is that in the enumeration of
the different parts of a carriage we do not come on what makes it
answer the ends of a carriage They do not wish to show themselves
elegant-looking as jade, but (prefer) to be coarse-looking as an
(ordinary) stone





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